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How is Aviation Tackling Global Climate Change?

What is aviation generally, and Business Aviation specifically doing to tackle global climate change? Dave Higdon reviews, highlighting how the aviation community is taking positive, proactive steps...

Dave Higdon   |   6th July 2018
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Dave Higdon Dave Higdon

Dave Higdon writes about aviation from his base in Wichita Kansas. During three decades in...
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What is aviation generally, and Business Aviation specifically doing to tackle global climate change? Dave Higdon reviews, highlighting how the aviation community is taking positive, proactive steps...
 
 
While a vast majority of the world’s science accepts data confirming the effects of increased carbon dioxide saturation as a causal factor behind higher average temperatures, more-frequent storms and rising sea levels, a small politically-influential segment of the population continues to reject the facts underpinning scientific’ conclusions.
 
The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) sees no conflict and accepts the scientific facts by adopting a series of technical rules for the measurement and reporting of carbon emissions from aircraft under the upcoming Carbon Offsetting Reduction Scheme for International Aviation (CORSIA).
 
Aviation is stepping up to help offset the impact of its own contributions to carbon dioxide levels and will be working to implement those rules starting in January.
 
The world's aviation authorities have accepted the science for fact – and are active participants in the effort to stem the rising CO2 levels contributing to the negative outcomes.
 
 
Little Impact on Business Aviation

With implementation set for January, CORSIA aims to cap worldwide carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from aviation, first targeting international operators which emit more than 10,000 metric tons of CO2 annually on flights between approximately 74 participating nations.
 
Those operators will be required to purchase carbon credits to offset growth above 2020 CO2 levels. But this rule stands to have minimal impact on business aircraft operators.
 
Steve Brown, NBAA Chief Operating Officer, noted the Standards and Recommended Practices represent the logical progression of steps necessary for the implementation of CORSIA, and pose no significant changes from prior ICAO guidance for the industry.
 
“NBAA is pleased to see this process continue to unfold in line with our expectations, and we commend ICAO for continuing to mature this program and provide guidance and information that we believe is useful and helpful to operators," Brown said.
 
"Our industry remains committed to demonstrating good environmental stewardship, and NBAA will continue our involvement in this process through IBAC as development continues.”
 
The pity is that so many others in the US continue to whistle past the graveyard where this kind of pollution is an issue. Most of them bow to political arguments seeking to deny the problem or, at the least, dispute humanity's role in creating the problem.
 
But aviation, being a science-based activity, is stepping up and doing its part to reduce the impact of a problem with global implications. Good for aviation.
 
 
 
 
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Read more about: Fuel Management | Aircraft Fuel | Dave Higdon | Climate Change

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