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What's Your Used Beechcraft King Air Worth Today?

What are the specific points of value in the used Beechcraft King Air marketplace? Jeremy Cox spotlights this popular business turboprop series with an eye on their values today…

Jeremy Cox   |   26th April 2018
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Jeremy Cox Jeremy Cox

Jeremy Cox is president, JetValues-Jeremy LLC and enjoys direct interface between aircraft...
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What are the specific points of value in the used Beechcraft King Air marketplace? Jeremy Cox spotlights this popular business turboprop series with an eye on their values today…

An average, approximately 11 used retail transactions occur each year for each King Air model. There have been a total of 4,034 used transactions since January 2010, showing this legendary aircraft series still has plenty of market appeal today.

Following, we spotlight some of the points of value specific to the King Air aircraft series, including details on how one model in a series differs from another.

King Air 350 Models

The standard King Air 350 model is a derivative of the King Air 300. It offers approximately 40cu.ft.  greater cabin volume over both the King Air 300 and 200; its wings are longer and stronger (enabling it to accommodate increased payload weights) and its wings feature winglets.

Like its smaller King Air 300 sister-ship, the King Air 350 is powered by two 1,050shp Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-60A turboprop engines. With 544USG of fuel, the King Air 350 will comfortably fly 1,580nm, with healthy reserves remaining.

Dual Aft Body Strakes were installed as standard equipment in 2001, and the avionics suite was Collins' EFIS 85 until 2004, when Rockwell Collins' Proline 21 became standard.

The following models were developed within the King Air 350 series:

  • The King Air 350C was built with a 52x49” Cargo Door. The standard Air-Stair Door was retained, and is structurally integral within the ‘Big’ door.
  • The King Air 350i became the standard model in 2008. The upgrades that denote it as a 350i include: iPod, iPhone, and iPad docking; Collins Venue CMS; an Advanced Sound Damping system; electrochromic window darkeners; and cabin design improvements. In 2017, Collins Proline Fusion became the new standard avionics suite.
  • First made available in 2007, the King Air 350ER model is either a 350, 350C, or a 350i that is equipped with Long Range Fuel Tanks giving it >40% additional fuel over a non-ER aircraft. To accommodate the extra fuel the MGTOW was increased from 15,000lbs, up to 16,500lbs. The ER model has been sold in great numbers to both US, and foreign militaries.

King Air 350 Series Retail Values

Following is a thumbnail of residual King Air values for selected models, chosen based on ‘Average Year of Manufacture’ of all available resale aircraft on the market.

The residual value of a 2013 King Air 350iER is indicated to be at about 74% of its new price, based upon a List Price in 2013 of $7.275m, and a retail value today of $5.4m. The 2018 list price of a current production King Air 350iER is $7.384m.

The residual value of a 2000 King Air 350 is currently at about 44% of its new price. (The 2000 List Price was $5.26m and the current retail value is $2.3m.)


Beechcraft King Air 350 Turboprop

King Air 350 Upgrades/Modifications & Value Impact

Following is list of ‘Appraised Value Add-Ons’ for the King Air 350 series of aircraft. (Note: these are my numbers, not the numbers from the value guides. They are also not valued ‘dollar for dollar’ from the options guides for each aircraft…)

  • ER Tanks - $500,000
  • Cargo Door - $450,000
  • TCAS 4000 (II) - $60,000
  • WAAS/LPV FMS - $50,000
  • Flight Data Recorder - $35,000
  • Brake De-Ice - $10,000

King Air 300 Models

The standard King Air 300 model is based on the King Air 200, but utilizes the more powerful 1,050shp PT6A-60A engines that are found on the 350. This shortened the range of the King Air 300 over the King Air 200 (1,500nm versus 1,600nm), but enabled it to carry more weight. MGTOW was increased up to 14,000lbs on the King Air 300.

The additional power also resulted in a cruise speed increase (300ktas versus 275ktas) and much improved climb performance in the King Air 300 model. Four-blade Hartzell propellers are standard and the King Air 300 incorporates a damage tolerant multi-element wing spar. With the development of the King Air 300, wing attachment went from clevis bolts in ‘tension’ (mounted, and tightened end-on pointing towards the wing) to a new ‘in-shear’ arrangement.

The King Air 300LW (Light Weight) variant is identical to the standard model, except for the MGTOW being restricted to 12,500lbs. This variant was created for countries that would not certify the aircraft above 12,500lbs.

King Air 300 Retail Value

The residual value of a 1987 King Air 300 is currently at about 44% of its new price. (The 1987 List Price was $2.967m, and the current retail value is $1.3m.

King Air 250

There is only one version of the King Air 250, meanwhile. It was new in 2011, and is the current production version of the venerable 200 series, but with factory Winglets, Ram Air Recovery as standard, and new turbo-fan propellers.

The King Air 250 utilizes the PT6A-52 powerplant (de-rated to 850shp each, but with the same hot section as the -60As utilized on the King Air 300, and a larger compressor) which powered its older sister, the King Air B200GT.

The majority of the fleet are equipped with the Rockwell Collins Proline 21 avionics suite. However, just like the King Air 350, in 2017 the standard suite changed to Proline Fusion.


Beechcraft King Air 250

King Air 250 Retail Value

The residual value of a 2013 King Air 250 is currently at about 62% of its new value, based on a 2013 List Price of $6.02m, and a current retail value of ~$3.7m. The 2018 list price for a King Air 250 is $6.085m.

King Air 200 Models

Introduced in 1974, the standard King Air 200, utilizes 850shp PT6A-41 powerplants, providing it with 1,600nm range and an MGTOW of 12,500lbs. This particular model has proven popular over the years with many variants being introduced to the market at different points.

  • The King Air 200C incorporated a 52x49” cargo door. The standard air-stair door was retained, and is structurally integral within the ‘Big’ door.
  • The King Air 200T (new in 1976) is a special missions King Air, primarily designed for Maritime Surveillance. It is a standard model, with Tip Tanks added, and a 360-degree search radar system.
  • The King Air B200 is identical to the King Air 200, except for having a shortened, but widened center pedestal in the cockpit allowing more avionics to be installed. Additionally, the engines were upgraded from the PT6A-41 to the -42 powerplants. Deliveries started in 1981. Beginning in 1994 the B200 incorporated the new damage tolerant multi-element wing spar that was first introduced on the King Air 300, and in October 2003 the standard Collins EFIS 84 avionics suite was changed to Proline 21.
  • The King Air B200C has a 52x49” Cargo Door. The standard air-stair door was retained, and is structurally integral within the ‘Big’ door.
  • The King Air B200SE, introduced in 1995, is identical to the B200 except for it being equipped with Collins EFIS 84. The ‘SE’ designation was dropped after 12 months and it went back to the ‘B200’ designation.
  • Finally, the King Air B200GT (new in 2008) is identical to the late model, Proline 21-equipped B200, except for the engines being upgraded to the PT6A-52.

King Air 200 Series Retail Values

The residual value of a 1979 model King Air 200 is currently at about 60% of its new price (the 1979 List Price was $1.34m), based on a current retail value of $800k. Meanwhile, the residual value of a 2008 King Air B200GT is currently at about 49% of its new price of $5.268m. The current retail value is $2.6m. King Air 200 Upgrades/Modifications & Value Impact Following is list of ‘Appraised Value Add-Ons’ for the King Air 200 series of aircraft. (Note: these are my numbers, not the numbers from the value guides. They are also not valued ‘dollar for dollar’ from the options guides for each aircraft…)

  • Blackhawk Conversion - $850,000
  • BLR Winglets - $50,000
  • Wing Lockers - $45,000
  • High Floatation Gear - $20,000
  • High Floatation Gear Doors - $20,000
  • Dual Aft Body Strakes - $18,000
  • Enhanced Performance Leading Edge - $20,000
  • Ram Air Recovery - $35,000

King Air 100 Series Models

There are three versions of the King Air 100. The standard King Air 100 began delivering in 1969; the King Air A100 was new in 1972 and the B100 was introduced in 1976. The King Air 100 offers an additional 50ins fuselage length over the King Air 90 series aircraft, and seats eight in the cabin. It also features a larger rudder and dual main landing gear wheels.

Powered by the PT6A-28 (680shp), the King Air 100 has an MGTOW of 10,600lbs and has 373USG of useable fuel.

The King Air A100 is the same as a standard King Air 100 except for having a higher MGTOW of 11,500lbs and an additional 94USG fuel capacity. The propellers were upgraded to Four-Blade models. Most A100 aircraft were delivered with the PT6A-34 engine (750shp) while three A100-1 models were built using 850shp PT6A-41 engines.

The King Air B100 is the same as the A100 except for having Garrett TPE331-6-252B engines in place of the PT6A powerplants. These have a lower fuel consumption, upping the range of the B100 by 350nm. MGTOW also increased to 11,800lbs.


Beechcraft King Air B100

King Air 100 Retail Value

The residual value of a 1970 King Air A100 is currently at about 62% of the 1970 List Price of $650k. The current retail value is $400k.

Meanwhile, the residual value of a 1978 King Air B100 is about 64% of its 1978 List Price of $981,300. The current retail value is ~$625k.

King Air 100 Upgrades/Modifications & Value Impact

Following is list of ‘Appraised Value Add-Ons’ for the King Air 100 series of aircraft. (Note: these are my numbers, not the numbers from the value guides. They are also not valued ‘dollar for dollar’ from the options guides for each aircraft…)

  • King Air B100 with Dash 10 Engine - $100,000


King Air 90 Series

Finally, at the smaller end of the King Air series, the King Air 90 was essentially a pressurized cabin, turboprop powered version of the Beech Queen Air (the Beech Model 88 was used as the basis, and was pressurized, but powered by two Lycoming IGSO-540 380hp piston engines.

Aboard the original King Air 90, which first delivered in 1964, the three-blade propellers were not reversible, and useable fuel was 384USG. MGTOW, meanwhile, was 9,000lbs. Also in the King Air 90 series:

  • The King Air A90 (new in 1966) is the same as a King Air 90 except for the installation of PT6A-20 (550shp) engines, which also added the capability for reversible propellers. The MGTOW is also higher at 9,300lbs.
  • The King Air B90 (1968) is essentially an A90 with an overall wingspan increase of 5ins, allowing for an increased MGTOW of 9,650lbs. An additional cabin side window was also added.
  • The King Air C90 (1971) is the same as a B90 except for a tapped engine bleed air system for cabin pressurization, instead of relying on the engine driven Roots compressor. This system came from the King Air 100. Starting in 1975 the engines were upgraded to PT6A-21.
  • Introduced in 1972, the King Air E90 was the same as the original C90, except for the PT6A-28 engines (680shp) which allowed an increase in MGTOW up to 10,100lbs.
  • New in 1982, the King Air C90-1 is the same as the post1975 model C90 except it incorporated a stronger horizontal stabilizer, and the same air-stair door as the King Air 200.
  • The King Air C90A is the same as the C90-1, but with the new damage tolerant multi-element wing spar (wing bolts went from ‘tension’, to ‘shear’ mountings), aerodynamically improved engine cowlings, and an electro-hydraulic landing gear actuation system. The C90A delivered new from 1984.
  • Introduced in 1992, the King Air C90B is the same as the C90A except for four-blade props, better cabin soundproofing, King Air 350 interior styling, three-position flaps, and Collins EFIS 84 avionics.
  • The King Air C90SE is the same as the C90B except for three-blade propellers and panel mounted Bendix-King avionics. The space normally taken up by the remotely located avionics system boxes is a baggage compartment. The SE, new in 1994, was built in response to competing single engine turboprops. It was lower priced than the C90B.
  • The King Air C90GT is the same as the C90B except for PT6A-135A engines (750shp de-rated down to 550shp). It was new in 2006.
  • Delivering new in 2008, the King Air C90GTi is the same as the GT, except for having Rockwell Collins' Proline 21 as the standard avionics suite.
  • The King Air C90GTx is the same as the GTi, except for having factory Winglets, and an increased MGTOW up to 10,485lbs. It is the current production model, and in 2017 the standard delivered suite was changed to Collins Proline Fusion.


Beechcraft King Air C90SE Turboprop


Finally, there are two versions of the King Air F90: The standard King Air F90 (new in 1979) and the King Air F90-1 (new in 1983). The F90 is the same as an E90 except for having the TTail similar to the King Air 200, the same nose, and windshield as the 200, and PT6A-135 engines that produce 750shp, and drive four-blade Hartzell props. The F90-1 is very similar to the standard model, except for upgraded PT6A-135A engines.

King Air 90 Series Retail Value

The residual value of a 1967 King Air A90 is currently at about 77% of its 1967 List Price ($420k), and currently it retails at ~$324k.

At $700k, a 1985 King Air C90’s residual value is currently at about 46% of its 1985 List Price of $1.52m.

Residual value of a 2007 King Air C90GT is currently about 58% of its new price, based on a 2007 List Price of $2.952m. The current retail value is $1.7m.

A 2013 King Air C90GTx currently has a residual value at about 68% of its $3.834m 2013 List Price. Current retail value is $2.6m. A 2018 model King Air C90GTx is priced at $3.87m.

The residual value of a 1976 King Air E90 is approximately 77% of its List Price of $752k, and it currently retails for approximately $575k.

The residual value of a 1981 King Air F90 is currently at about 60% of its original List Price of $1.478m. The current retail value is $880k.


King Air 90 Upgrades/Modifications & Value Impact

Following is list of ‘Appraised Value Add-Ons’ for the King Air 90 series of aircraft. (Note: these are my numbers, not the numbers from the value guides. They are also not valued ‘dollar for dollar’ from the options guides for each aircraft…)

  • Blackhawk Conversion - $700,000
  • BLR Winglets - $50,000
  • Wing Lockers - $45,000
  • Dual Aft Body Strakes - $18,000

 

 

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Read more about: Beechcraft King Air | King Air Turboprops | Turboprop Market Analysis | Business Aircraft Values | Turboprops Comparison | Turboprop Comparisons | Turboprop Aircraft | Operating Costs | Mike Chase

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